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Acupuncture for painful periods

acupuncture for period pain quay health sydney cbd circular quayA recent study in Australia and New Zealand has demonstrated that acupuncture is beneficial for the treatment of dysmenorrhea.

 

More than half of all women suffer with painful periods.  This trial focused on women between the age of 18 and 45.  It found that after receiving three months of acupuncture treatment,  more than half of these women had at least fifty percent reduction in their severity of their period pain.  Many of the women also reported less need to use painkillers to treat their period pain and an improvement in secondary symptoms, such as headaches and nausea.

 

In Chinese medicine, acupuncture has been used to relieve dysmenorrhea for centuries. In traditional Chinese medicine, there is such a sentence, “unblocked would be no pain, pain is obstructed “. Dysmenorrhea patients can usually use acupuncture and moxibustion with traditional Chinese medicine to relieve dysmenorrhea. And when in ovulation, acupuncture treatment for several times can alleviate the physical discomfort.

Si Chen Acupuncturist Quay Health Sydney CBD

Si Chen is Quay Health’s Traditional Chinese Medicine Practitioner specialising in women’s reproductive health and fertility.

To book an appoitment call Quay Health on 9252 2825

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Eat your way calm – psychobiotics and the gut brain connection

A new and exciting era in the treating of mental illness could be upon us!

I have blogged before about the gut and its affect on our mental state. Though, now money is now being put into research of this fascinating subject.

With the gut-brain connection is now very well established a new wave of research is now being done into psychobiotics.

Healthy Eating gut health acupuncture chiropractic Quay Health circular quay sydney cbd

These are, in short; biotics for the gut. Were as antibiotics are designed for the killing of bad bacteria. Psycho-biotics will be used for the increasing of good bacteria. Resulting in a much more diverse gut flora and better moods.

 

 

So far, the research on psychobiotics is still preliminary. Studies have shown that increasing the amount of “good” bacteria in the gut can curb inflammation and cortisol levelsreduce symptoms of depression and anxietylower stress reactivity, improve memory, and even lessen neuroticism and social anxiety. However, most of these studies were conducted on mice, and more research on humans is needed.”

The unfortunate thing is that approval for this new type of treatment is approximately 10 years away. But there are things that can be done in the meantime.;

 

1) Consuming probiotic foods

Yogurt

One of the best known probiotic foods is live-cultured yogurt, especially handmade. Read your labels, as many popular brands are filled with high fructose corn syrup, artificial sweeteners, and artificial flavors and are way too close to being a nutritional equivalent of ice cream. As with most food, the most health claims made on the packaging means more marketing, not more nutritional value.

 

Miso Soup

 Miso is one the mainstays of traditional Japanese medicine and is commonly used in macrobiotic cooking as a digestive regulator. Made from fermented rye, beans, rice or barley, adding a tablespoon of miso to some hot water makes an excellent, quick, probiotic-rich soup.

 

Sauerkraut

 Made from fermented cabbage (and sometimes other vegetables), sauerkraut is not only extremely rich in healthy live cultures, but might also help with reducing allergy symptoms. Sauerkraut is also rich in vitamins B, A, E and C.

 gut brain health food health wellbeing acupuncture quay health sydney cbd circular quay

Kefir

Similar to yogurt, this fermented dairy product is a unique combination of goat’s milk and fermented kefir grains. High in lactobacilli and bifidus bacteria, kefir is also rich in antioxidants. Look for a good, organic version at your local health food store.

 

Kombucha

 This is a form of fermented tea that contains a high amount of healthy gut bacteria. This probiotic drink has been used for centuries and is believed to help increase your energy, enhance your wellbeing, and maybe even help you lose weight. However, kombucha tea may not be the best fit for everyone, especially those who’ve had problems with candida.

 

Mircoalgae

Although this isn’t a food per se, it’s great to add to your morning smoothie. Microaglae refers to superfood ocean-based plants such as spirulina, chorella, and blue-green algae.

 

Pickles

 Believe it or not, the common green pickle is an excellent food source of probiotics. The less commercialized the better, but most pickles will have some microbial value.

 

Tempeh

 I wouldn’t necessarily call soy a health food any longer as it’s mostly GMO. However, tempeh can be a great substitute for meat or tofu. Tempeh is a fermented, probiotic-rich grain made from soy beans. A great source of vitamin B12, this vegetarian food can be sautéed, baked, or eaten crumbled on salads.

 

Kimchi

An Asian form of pickled sauerkraut, kimchi is an extremely spicy and sour fermented cabbage, typically served alongside meals in Korea. Besides beneficial bacteria, Kimchi is also a great source of beta-carotene, calcium, iron and vitamins A, C, B1 and B2. Kimchi is one of the best probiotic foods you can add to your diet, assuming you can handle the spice, of course.

 

Poi

 Poi is a staple food of Hawaii, made by mashing cooked taro plant until its consistency is liquid to dough-like. Poi hasn’t been officially recognized as a probiotic food like these others, even though it contains more beneficial bacteria that yogurt. While poi is loaded with good germs, it’s stirred up some controversy as there’s currently no way to mass produce it in a way that’s 100% sanitized. (In order to pass health and hygiene standards in America to prepare and sell anything, everything has to be 100% sanitized.) Too bad, because fresh, fermented poi is teeming with bacteria. In order to reap these benefits from po, you might have to fly to Hawaii to get it, which sounds fine to me!

 

2) Meditate

wellness quay health sydney cbd circular quay chiropractor, acupuncuture, massageMost people “don’t think” they have time for this. Though, all you need is a quiet room. If you don’t have one I suggest purchasing some noise cancelling headphones. Put and turn them on, sit in a dark room and just concentrate on your breathing. Start trying to do this for only 5 minutes per session and then gradually increase the time as you get better. Meditation is like exercise, you get better with practise.

 

3) Exercise

for at least 30 minutes per day. You don’t have to train like an Olympian to get the benefits. Though, you have to make the sessions as intense as you can handle to get the benefits in full.

 

Darren Geer Acupuncturist Quay Health Sydney CBD Circular Quay traditional chinese medicineDr Darren Geer, Acupuncturist

Quay Health

To book an appointment with Darren click here

References:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com.au/entry/gut-bacteria-mental-health_us_581770a7e4b064e1b4b3a842

 

http://www.mindbodygreen.com/0-9331/top-10-probiotic-foods-to-add-to-your-diet.html

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If only I could get some sleep

Michelle always felt tired and sleepy in the day time, because she could not sleep at night. It usually took her more than 1 hour to fall asleep, and sometimes even the whole night until 5-6am, even though she was really sleepy.

Daniel a 12 years old, used to lie down on his desk at the school, due to his dreaminess at night.

Ben also has a sleeping problem. He always wakes up very early around 3-4am. After waking up, he would not be able to go back to sleep, no matter how sleepy he was.

insomnia treatment acupuncture Quay Health Sydney CBDInsomnia is one of the most common health problems in the world. From research, there are one out of three people who will suffer from some form of sleep disturbance during their lifetime. For some they would continue for many years, and they would try many ways to deal with it, including having sleeping medication or drugs, but these would not work when they stop taking it.

 

Clinically, insomnia may occur individually or be accompanied by the manifestations of headaches, dizziness, palpitations, amnesia, etc. Insomnia is a disease, and long-term lack of treatment or mitigation will inevitably lead to a series of adverse consequences, such as reduction in the quality of work and life, reduction in the body’s immune system, endocrine disorders, easily leading to and aggravating infectious diseases, cerebrovascular diseases, diabetes, gastrointestinal diseases and so on.

 

In Chinese Medicine, insomnia can be divided into three different types according to the pattern of the sleep problem.

 

The first type of insomnia is that people try hard to fall asleep. If it takes over thirty minutes to fall asleep, it is defined as insomnia, but in some cases it can take hours and in several cases people just will not fall asleep until the sun comes up. This pattern in Chinese medicine is associated with a deficiency of the heart yin energy. The yin energy is the energy that calms, cools and moistens. Its function is especially important at night time. When the yin energy is deficient, our mind cannot calm down, and we would feel irritable and hot during the night and cannot have good quality sleep. This condition is associated with long term stress or overworking. Commonly associated symptoms are: night heat or night sweats, palpitations, dizziness, tinnitus, poor memory and concentration, constipation, dry mouth at nights and red tongue. The treatment for this type of insomnia is with Acupuncture points that nourish the yin energy reducing heat and calming the spirit. In addition to sleeping better the patient should also feel an all-around improvement in his physical and emotional health. Acupuncture for Shenmai(BL62), Zhaohai(KI6), Taixi(KI3), Dalin (PC7), Shenmen(HT7), Taichong(LR3) can help for that.

 

The second type of insomnia is when sleep is easy but the quality of sleep that follows is poor. The person feels that the sleep is very light and often wakes up. Sometimes it feels as if no sleep has been had at all. This type of insomnia is usually due to over work and over thinking which weaken the energies of the heart and the spleen; the digestive system. The heart in Chinese Medicine is in charge of sleep and mental activities and needs sufficient nourishment to function properly. Other symptoms often associated with this pattern are palpitations, fatigue, poor appetite and digestive problems. The treatment is by using acupuncture to nourish the heart and strengthen the digestive systems and improvement in sleep should soon follow. For acupuncture, we usually use: Xinshu(BL15), Pishu(BL20), Baihui((DU20), Shenmen(HT7), Sanyinjiao(SP6), Neiguan(PCC6). If dreaminess, can also use Pohu(BL42), Yinbai(SP1), lidui(ST45), Daling(PC7).

 

The third type of insomnia is when the problem is waking up early in the morning. The person will wake up some time between 3 and 6 in the morning and will not be able to go back to sleep. In Chinese medicine this problem is related to the liver and it is usually caused by emotional problems, stress or worry. Like worrying about what will need to do during the daytime. Other symptoms often associated with this type of insomnia are: irritability, tearfulness and sometimes light headedness. The treatment is with Acupuncture points that treat the liver and calm the mind. You can expect an improvement in your mood and general feeling, in addition to sleeping better. For the acupoint, we can use: Xinjian(LR2), Zuqiaoyin(GB44), Fengchi(GB20), Shenmen(HT7), Sishencong(EX-HN1) etc.

 

Those suffering from insomnia understand how important a good night’s sleep is in order to feel great and be productive the next day. Acupuncture for insomnia is one treatment that can help to alleviate insomnia without the need to take potentially harmful prescription sleeping aids. It focuses on treating the whole body and not just the symptoms, the root cause of the insomnia will be addressed, be it stress, pain, dietary irregularities, etc. By resolving the underlying imbalance, the insomnia will effectively be treated, and the individual will enjoy a better overall quality of life.

 

To find relief from your insomnia book an appointment to see Quay Health’s accupuncturist’s Si Chen and Darren Geer.  Call 9252 2825 to book an appointment.

Si Chen Acupuncturist Quay Health Sydney CBD

Si Chen
Acupuncturist
Quay Health Sydney CBD

 

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Insomnia, is acupuncture the answer?

Michelle always felt tired and sleepy in the day time, because she could not sleep at night. It usually took her more than 1 hour to fall asleep, and sometimes even the whole night until 5-6am, even though she was really sleepy.

Daniel a 12 years old, used to lie down on his desk at the school, due to his dreamlessness at night.

Ben also has a sleeping problem. He always wakes up very early around 3-4am. After waking up, he would not be able to go back to sleep, no matter how sleepy he was.

Insomnia is one of the most common health problems in the world. From research, there are one out of three people who will suffer from some form of sleep disturbance during their lifetime. For some this will continue for many years, and they will try many ways to deal with it, including having sleeping medication or drugs, but, it will stop working when they stop taking it.

Clinically, insomnia may occur individually or be accompanied by the manifestations of headaches, dizziness, palpitations, amnesia, etc. Insomnia is a disease, and long-term lack of treatment or mitigation will inevitably lead to a series of adverse consequences, such as reduction in the quality of work and life, reduction in the body’s immune system, endocrine disorders, easily leading to and aggravating infectious diseases, cerebrovascular diseases, diabetes, gastrointestinal diseases and so on.

In Chinese Medicine, insomnia can be divided into three different types according to the pattern of the sleep problem.

The first type of insomnia is that people try hard to fall asleep. If it takes over thirty minutes to fall asleep, it is defined as insomnia, but in some cases it can take hours and in several cases people just will not fall asleep until the sun comes up. This pattern in Chinese medicine is associated with a deficiency of the heart yin energy. The yin energy is the energy that calms, cools and moistens. Its function is especially important at night time. When the yin energy is deficient, our mind cannot calm down, and we would feel irritable and hot during the night and cannot have good quality sleep. This condition is associated with long term stress or overworking. Commonly associated symptoms are: night heat or night sweats, palpitations, dizziness, tinnitus, poor memory and concentration, constipation, dry mouth at nights and red tongue. The treatment for this type of insomnia is with Acupuncture points that nourish the yin energy reducing heat and calming the spirit. In addition to sleeping better the patient should also feel an all-around improvement in his physical and emotional health. Acupuncture for Shenmai(BL62), Zhaohai(KI6), Taixi(KI3), Dalin (PC7), Shenmen(HT7), Taichong(LR3) can help for that.

The second type of insomnia is when sleep is easy but the quality of sleep that follows is poor. The person feels that the sleep is very light and often wakes up. Sometimes it feels as if no sleep has been had at all. This type of insomnia is usually due to over work and over thinking which weaken the energies of the heart and the spleen; the digestive system. The heart in Chinese Medicine is in charge of sleep and mental activities and needs sufficient nourishment to function properly. Other symptoms often associated with this pattern are palpitations, fatigue, poor appetite and digestive problems. The treatment is by using acupuncture to nourish the heart and strengthen the digestive systems and improvement in sleep should soon follow. For acupuncture, we usually use: Xinshu(BL15), Pishu(BL20), Baihui((DU20), Shenmen(HT7), Sanyinjiao(SP6), Neiguan(PCC6). If dreaminess, can also use Pohu(BL42), Yinbai(SP1), lidui(ST45), Daling(PC7).

The third type of insomnia is when the problem is waking up early in the morning. The person will wake up some time between 3 and 6 in the morning and will not be able to go back to sleep. In Chinese medicine this problem is related to the liver and it is usually caused by emotional problems, stress or worry. Like worrying about what will need to be done during the daytime. Other symptoms often associated with this type of insomnia are: irritability, tearfulness and sometimes light headedness. The treatment is with Acupuncture points that treat the liver and calm the mind. You can expect an improvement in your mood and general feeling, in addition to sleeping better. For the acupoint, we can use: Xinjian(LR2), Zuqiaoyin(GB44), Fengchi(GB20), Shenmen(HT7), Sishencong(EX-HN1) etc.

Those suffering from insomnia understand how important a good night’s sleep is in order to feel great and be productive the next day. Acupuncture for insomnia is one treatment that can help to alleviate insomnia without the need to take potentially harmful prescription sleeping aids. It focuses on treating the whole body and not just the symptoms, the root cause of the insomnia will be addressed, be it stress, pain, dietary irregularities, etc. By resolving the underlying imbalance, the insomnia will effectively be treated, and the individual will enjoy a better overall quality of life.

Si Chen
Acupuncturist
Quay Health

To book an appointment with Si Chen call us on 9252 2825 or book online at
www.quayhealth.com.au.cliniko.com/bookings#service

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Stress!

 

Stress – the ultimate buzz word associated with modern living and many of us experience it at some time with stress symptoms presenting in many forms.

 

shutterstock_132130631Stress symptoms may include:

  • fatigue
  • insomnia
  • hyperinsomnia (sleepiness during the day)
  • nausea
  • depression
  • high blood pressure
  • unstable emotions
  • craving sweet foods
  • weight gain
  • headaches
  • lower back pain
  • indecision
  • tense muscles

 

From a Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) point of view, many of these symptoms are separated into issues of the organs that are being affected. Below I have identified some of the basic ways a TCM practitioner is looking at your body when diagnosing. I have kept it brief to avoid confusion and acknowledge that there are other signs and symptoms that may be present however, only the ones above are discussed below. Also, in considering the particular organ affected, this is not being looked at from a western medicine point view even though TCM accepts western medical understanding of internal organs.

 

1. Fatigue: the only symptom that shows a problem with virtually all organs, blood and oxygen (Qi) flow.

2. Insomnia: heart, your mind is too busy; kidneys, you’re so rundown that you cannot stay asleep for a whole 6-8 hrs; spleen, too much worrying; and the liver, you want to break out of your current situation but can’t.

3. Hyperinsomnia: liver, you’re so stressed that your circulation has become blocked; spleen, a heavy daytime tiredness usually associated with stress and a diet of mainly fatty and sweet processed foods.

4. Menstrual problems: liver and gall bladder have blockages.

5. Nausea: when the liver becomes blocked, it can attack the stomach causing nausea.

6. Depression: a major problem within our society, as are all mental health issues. TCM theory has many reasons for depression including; kidney deficiency, blocked liver, oxygen (Qi) deficiency, blood deficiency, stomach dysfunction and heart deficiency.

7. High blood pressure: as with western medicine, heart and kidneys.

8. Unstable emotions: depends on which emotion is either excessive or deficient, as to what organ is affected.

9. Craving sweet foods: liver and spleen (pancreas).

10. Weight gain: kidneys (including fluid retention), poor diet, inactivity and spleen deficiency. There are obviously many western medical reasons for this and 100% of them are accepted by most TCM practitioners.

11. Headaches: liver, kidneys, gall bladder, bladder, lungs, spleen, stomach, large intestine and heart.

12. Lower back pain, without a physical reason: kidneys, bladder and gall bladder.

13. Indecision: gall bladder.

14. Tense muscles: liver and gall bladder

 

As you can see there are many ways that stress can affect our body and organs. If you are interested in finding out how I can help with your stress, contact us to make a booking.

 

Acupuncturist Darren Geer Quay Health Sydney CBD Acupuncture
Darren Geer, Acupuncturist
BASc ACup
CMR0001715102

To make an appointment with Darren click here

Quay Health 9252 2825

Level 6, 10 Bridge Street Sydney

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Acupuncture and pain

 

For thousands of years acupuncture has been used as a way of treating pain.  But how does it do it?

 

In Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) theory, the body can be divided into 14 standard meridian lines and 8 extra meridian lines. Pain is caused when one of these lines is blocked. For example, if you have a rotator cuff injury, the likely affected meridian will be the small intestine meridian. If you have pain in the legs, the gall bladder or stomach meridian may be affected. The location of the pain is a direct determinant of where the needles will be inserted.

how does acupuncture work quay health sydney cbd acupuncturist Darren Geer

Other factors determining where the needles will be inserted include:

  • overall condition of the body;
  • type of pain you are experiencing – aching, sharp, tension and moving pain;
  • your overall energy level, plus tongue diagnosis and pulse diagnosis; and
  • your emotional state.

 

 

When pain occurs, acupuncturists generally view it as either a blockage or lack of circulation through the meridian. The acupuncturist’s job is then to clear the blockage or increase the flow through the meridian line.

 

Now this doesn’t mean that the an acupuncturist will necessarily just put a needle in to the point of the pain. When another type of therapist does this, it is referred to as “dry needling” and is very different to acupuncture. Acupuncture has its own version of this, which is much more gentle and a lot less painful.

 

Side effects – the only known side effects of traditional acupuncture include:

    • it does nothing;
    • the problem can get worse before it gets better; and
  • other signs and symptoms (that weren’t being treated) get better. 

    Acupuncturist Darren Geer Quay Health Sydney CBD Acupuncture
    Darren Geer, Acupuncturist
    BASc ACup
    CMR0001715102

To make an appointment with Darren click here

Quay Health 9252 2825

Level 6, 10 Bridge Street Sydney

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Colds and Flu, An Eastern and Western Perspective

That season is upon us. No, not winter but its but its potentially nasty cousin, the cold and flu season.

 

For many of us colds and flu are just another part of life that we just have to suffer through, by spending unnecessary amounts of money on trips to the Dr, cold and flu tablets, sore throat lozenges, cough syrup and any other product “they say” will help.  Though at best all these treatments can do is treat the symptoms.

 

One major misconception is many people uses the terms “cold and flu” interchangeably. But in reality there are major differences.

 

cold and flu treatment with acupuncture at Quay Health Sydney CBDIf you have a cold, you’ll probably experience symptoms such as:

  • runny or stuffy nose
  • sore throat
  • sneezing
  • mild-to-moderate fever
  • cough
  • headache or body aches
  • mild tiredness

 

According to the Mayo Clinic, more than 100 different viruses can cause the common cold. However, the rhinovirus is most often the one that makes people sneeze and sniffle, and it’s highly contagious. Other frequent cold-causing pathogens include coronaviruses and respiratory syncytial viruses. Most cold-causing viruses thrive in environments with low humidity, which may be why colds are more common during the fall and winter months. However, you can catch a cold any time of year.

http://www.healthline.com/health/cold-flu/cold-or-flu#CommonCold2

 

Flu symptoms can be similar to those of a cold, although they tend to be more severe. Symptoms can include:acupuncture pulse diagnosis Darren Geer  quay health sydney cbd

  • dry, hacking cough
  • moderate-to-high fever (although not everyone with the flu will run a fever)
  • sore throat
  • shaking chills
  • severe muscle or body aches
  • headache
  • stuffy and runny nose
  • profound fatigue (may last up to two weeks)

 

Some people may experience vomiting and diarrhea, but this is more common in children.

The seasonal flu is caused by the influenza A, B, and C viruses. Active strains of influenza virus vary from year to year. That’s why a new flu vaccine is formulated and released each year.

 

http://www.healthline.com/health/cold-flu/cold-or-flu#CommonCold2

 

Even though there are differences in the signs and symptoms, you can see how the terms cold and flu become interchangeable.

 

Standard treatments:

Colds usually clear up within a few days. Though there are many over the counter products that help reduce the signs and symptoms, such as: Cold and flu tablets, anti-histamines, throat lozenges, and cough syrup. (Many Dr’s are also known for prescribing antibiotics for this, which is ridiculous, unless there is a bacterial infection)

 

Flu’s treatment in most cases, fluids and rest are the best treatment. Over-the-counter treatments, very similar to the ones that treat colds, may control your symptoms and help you feel better. However, never give aspirin to children. It can increase the risk of a rare but serious condition called Reye’s syndrome. Drink plenty of fluids to prevent dehydration.

 

Your doctor may prescribe antiviral drugs — oseltamivir (Tamiflu), zanamivir (Relenza), or peramivir (Rapivab) — to treat the flu. These drugs can

shorten the duration of the flu and prevent complications such as pneumonia, but you need to take them within the first 48 hours of getting sick in order to have a positive impact.

http://www.healthline.com/health/cold-flu/cold-or-flu#CommonCold2

 

Another major difference between a cold and flu is. If you have the influenza virus, you can be bed ridden for up to 6 weeks.

 

So we have covered all of the western medical diagnosis’s of cold and flu. But did you know that acupuncture and TCM (Traditional Chinese Medicine) actually can treat the cause and not just the symptoms?!
TCM looks at colds and flu from a much more macro/esoteric viewpoint.

When referring to a cold or flu a TCM practitioners diagnosis is usually known as “wind cold or wind heat”. In other words the invasion of an external pathogen, sounds familiar? This can also include another “wonderful” winter diseases such as tonsillitis.

 

Signs & Symptoms: Wind Cold

  • cupping with acupuncture Quay Health Sydney CBDAn invasion of wind-cold is made possible when the Defensive Qi (Wei Qi) of the person is temporarily weaker than the force of the Pathogen. Weakened Defensive Qi (Wei Qi) may come about as a result of emotional stress, overwork, poor diet and a host of other factors.
  • Strong and/or frequent changes in environment also play a role (i.e. the effects of going outside on a cold winter day from a heated home).
  • Patient may have: An aversion to cold, shivering, low or no fever, chills predominated over feelings of heat, no sweat, occipital headache, stiff neck, body aches, slight cough, sneezing, running nose w/white discharge.
  • Tongue: Thin white coating (indicates cold) or normal (indicates wind)

Pulse: Floating, tight (indicates cold predominates) – Floating, slow (indicates wind predominates)

 

Signs & Symptoms: Wind Heat

  • Similar Wind invasion via weakened Wei Qi as described above in Wind-Cold but patient presents with heat signs.
  • Patient may have: Fever and Chills w/Fever predominating, slight sweating, runny nose w/yellow discharge, headaches, body aches, cough, sore throat (more severe than wind-cold), slight thirst.
  • Tongue: Red Sides

Pulse: Floating and Fast

https://theory.yinyanghouse.com/treatments/acupuncture_for_common_cold

 

Both of these diagnoses are commonly treated using acupuncture and in severe cases acupuncture and herbal medicine.

 

As a further point of interest, if you have ever have suffered from tonsillitis and your Dr has treated you with antibiotics. The antibiotics, (in my experience), only work in the case of wind heat.

 

I hope this has given you a general understanding of colds and flu from and east and west perspective. With the conclusion, you don’t always need to see a Dr for treatment of cold and flu symptoms. Though, when its sever go straight to the Dr or hospital.

Darren Geer Acupuncturist and Massage Therapist Quay Health Sydney

Darren Geer

Acupuncturist

ATMS 22126

CMR0001715102

 

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A simple and easy guide to how acupuncture works

 

Today, I was trawling through Facebook looking for ideas for another blog. When I came across an excellent short 3min video simply describing how acupuncture really works. It was so easy to understand that I decided to just simply post the link to the video, (link at bottom of this blog), as well as copy out its salient points. I have done this more as an easy reference. Rather than having to scroll back on your device which I know can be painful.

 

how does acupuncture work quay health sydney cbd acupuncturist Darren Geer

I have posted blogs and articles written by others including Dr’s and scientists but this one was much easier to grasp. I hope you enjoy and it gives you a better understanding of this amazing therapy.

 

 

 

 

How does acupuncture work? A simple and easy guide.

 

The mistranslations of ancient Chinese texts into English have given acupuncture a very mystical, esoteric and some say spooky reputation. Which has completely missed the mark of what it really is.

 

Acupuncture, does not enhance some strange universal power using divine intervention that helps you recover from your ailments. Even though some acupuncturists would like you to believe that.

 

Acupuncture is actually a real type of medicine or medicinal theory that is based on actual anatomy and physiology. Concentrating on the improving the flow of Oxygen (Qi), Blood (Xue) and Nutrients (Ying Qi).

 

The impairment of blood flow or blood stagnation is the number 1 cause of disease. Which makes sense, if there is a problem with blood flow to any area of the body there will be impaired function. 

 

The body cannot heal without blood flow to the affected area so this make sense,  as acupuncture helps the body heal itself.  Acupuncture does this by causing the blood vessels to dilate or constrict to either; increase or decrease blood flow to specific areas of the body. This is done to relieve pain and improve organ function.

 

It also works by stimulating the nervous system by activating nociceptor sensory nerves and proprioceptor fibers that travel from the skin, to the spine and to the brain. Acupuncture does this by improving nerve signals to your brain to realise opioids (natural painkillers) to shut off the pain signal eliminate the pain.

 

The combination of these two effects is what helps the body heal itself while reducing any pain. This is done by treating the 5 main factors that influence your health:

  1. The flow of oxygen (Qi)
  2. The flow of blood (Xue)
  3. The health of your blood vessels (Xue Mai)
  4. Health of your organs (Zang Fu)
  5. The health of the nervous system (Jing Mai)

 

Acupuncture can treat an endless number of conditions. Either on its own or in conjunction with Chinese herbal medicine or other therapies.

 

So if you are looking for a solution to your problems, without drugs or side effects, give Acupuncture a try.

 

Contact Quay Health on 02) 9252 2825 or at quayhealth.com.au.

 

Acupuncturist Darren Geer Quay Health Sydney CBD Acupuncture

 

Darren Geer

Acupuncturist

BASc Acup

CMR0001715102

http://youtu.be/_PeIUDuzogU

 

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Gut Health – You are what you eat

Approximately 6-7 years ago I attended a seminar on “Gut Health”. Ever since then I have been a big advocate of the importance of gut health and the overall wellbeing. In health circles there isn’t a more important quote than; “you are what you eat”!

you are what you eat, healthy eating, quay health sydney cbd

 

What I am happy to see is the amount of press the results of the relevant studies have received. Just last week a documentary appeared on SBS, The Diet Myth.

With the main aim of the documentary to explain obesity and how the new theories of gut health, relate.

 

As it turns out, the amount of microbes (bacteria) that live in the gut has a massive effect on your ability to lose weight and why the theory of “eat less do more”, does not work!

 

But before you “non activity lovers” get too excited. Exercise, is a very important aspect of a healthy body and mind. The human body is supposed to move. Our evolution has not caught up with our lifestyles yet and don’t expect it to any time soon.

 

Now, back to the track…

 

The main points of the documentary that relates to human health are:

 

·      The more gut microbes you have, the leaner you are.

 

·      If you still can’t lose weight even though you are doing all the right things. The reason is you don’t have enough have a board enough variety of gut microbes.

 

·      One reason for this is an over use of antibiotics. Use of antibiotics can cause havoc on the gut microbes which can take up to a year to sort themselves out after their use. Use of antibiotics in children increases their chance of becoming obese.

 

·      Poor diets, if you mostly consume sugar and saturated fat. Your gut microbe diversity becomes limited, at best.

 

·      Your diet has to be: clean, unprocessed and diverse.

 

·      Think of your gut microbes like a complete ecosystem. If you pollute an ecosystem what happens?! Species die!

 

·      Serotonin, our “happy chemicals” are produced in the brain by our gut microbes. If they are unhealthy it can make you depressed and anti-depressants will not work.

 

In conclusion, as you can see from the few examples I have given. Your gut is you!

 

If you require more advice on this subject. Book in for a consultation at quayhealth.com.au 

 

Darren Geer Acupuncturist and Massage Therapist Quay Health Sydney

Darren Geer / Acupuncturist and Traditional Chinese Medicine Expert

 

 

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Acupuncture, how does it work?

Almost everyday I will get a new, (and sometimes old), patient that asks, “How does acupuncture work?” Then I have to explain to the patient that to answer that question is not as easy as a + b = c.

ACUPUNCTURE AT QUAY HEALTH SYDNEY

Under our western understanding, the way acupuncture works borders with the esoteric to the religious, but the difference is, the results are tangible and measurable. Though, how those results are attained, isn’t. In other-words, western science has no idea how it works. I remember when I was at university approximately 20 years ago and my neuroscience professor tried to explain the theories that western medicine had for how acupuncture works and they were flawed at best. Now, all these years later there is still no explanation on exactly how it works. However, there is now at least science to show that it does.

 

The Chinese theory on how acupuncture works is based on the concept of “qi”.

 

For the sake of brevity, I am not going to go into a deep explanation of this concept, as it is a long winding road that seems to potentially have no end. But I will say the best way I can describe it is this; qi is matter on the verge of becoming energy and energy on the verge of becoming matter. Qi is said to be in everything and is what keeps us human beings upright and functioning. Sickness, in acupuncture/tcm theory is considered an imbalance and or a stagnation of qi.

 

One difficulty that most people have and even most acupuncture students is,  why is it that our society is so far advanced with technology with smart phones, stem cell research and amazing advancements in prosthetics, however, we still cannot explain how acupuncture works? My only answer is, we just haven’t developed the right machine yet. Though, I have a strong feeling that it isn’t to far away.

 

The simplest way to explain how acupuncture works is this. It helps the body to heal itself, by increasing and or balancing the blood circulation. The body’s ability to heal itself is well documented. Especially, when it is given the right tools to accomplish this task.

 

You maybe thinking, this is a very vague answer and I would have to agree with you. Though, it is the simplest way to explain an non-scientifically unmeasurable concept. To really get into the deepest of understanding would be to either study Taoism and Buddhism. The other option is to read the first ever book I read on acupuncture theory. “The Web That Has No Weaver” By Ted Kaptchuk. http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ted_Kaptchuk

Acupuncturist Darren Geer Quay Health Sydney CBD AcupunctureDarren Geer,  Acupuncturist

 

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